Hamlet - Destiny

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Hamlet - Destiny

In Shakespeare’s tragic tale of Hamlet, destiny is viewed as a predetermined course of events, which lead to the outcome of one’s future. Morals, values and beliefs reflect one’s destiny, since they affect the decisions and choices that are made. Based on experience and development of knowledge one discovers their likes and dislikes. These discoveries lead to certain goals, fears, dreams, desires and expectations that one would go to any extent to achieve. Collectively, all of this contributes to one’s destiny and what they, as individuals, desire for themselves. In the case of the play Hamlet, Claudius’ desires to be king influence him to make decisions that affect the outcome of his own destiny. When considering the character of Hamlet, one is able to see that it is his procrastination that ultimately fails him and stops him from coming in terms with his inner self. Gertrude, being blind to the fact that Claudius killed her husbdand, contributes to the colapse of Hamlet’s sense of individuation, and propels her character into fatal desiny. One would argue therefore that man is the author of his own desiny.
The character of Claudius makes several decisions that are morally wrong. In the decision to murder King Hamlet, lust overcomes love in a sense that he murders his own brother due to his desire to be King. His need for power allows him to sell his soul to the devil. After the murderous scheme is discovered by Hamlet, Claudius is troubled by his guilty conscience. “O, my offence is rank, it smell to heaven;/It hath the primal eldest curse upon’t-/A brother’s murder. Pray can I not/My stronger quilt defeats my strong intent.” (Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act III, Sc. iii..36-40) Still, however, he is not ready to give up the throne. It is obvious that Hamlet’s sudden madness is a result of his knowledge that Claudius did in fact kill Hamlet’s father. Nonetheless, the desire, and the longing to be king is far too strong for Claudius to resist. His need for power is so overwhelming that he does not have any other importance, thus controlling his destiny.
Hamlet’s need to dwell on the command of his father’s ghost, thus fail him to come in terms with his inner self. Due to continuos procrastination, his train of thought is altered several times. “And so am I reveng’d. That would be scann’d:/ A villain kills my father, and for that...