Andrew Jackson

PAGES  9
WORDS  1931



Andrew Jackson


Word Count: 1971

Jackson was a protector of democracy for "Equal protection and equal benefits" for all men. He wanted to be rid of any organization or institution promoting specific privilege to anyone.
Jackson felt that over time, the offices of the federal system had grown mold to a uniform party. He proceeded to seek diversity amongst officers, and while he removed no more officials than Jefferson, he succeeded in diversifying the system.
Since he believed that the power belonged to the people, Jackson instituted a new method for selecting presidential candidates. While previously there was held a Congressional Caucus, Jackson initiated a national nominating convention in order that the people might elect their candidates.
Jackson responding to challenge:
Nullification crisis
Jackson was presented with the problem of dealing with angry South Carolinians who were angered by tariffs.
His vice-president, Calhoun, a native to the protesting state, resigned from the vice-presidency to aid his state. He aided in preventing their secession from the Union, as he joined the pro-nullification group of elected officials.
The governor of South Carolina, Hayne, led the nullifiers, and Calhoun took his seat in the Senate
Jackson was infuriated with Calhoun, who realizing there was no wide-spread support for nullification [as time progressed], was bailed out by Henry Clay. Clay devised the plan that would lower the tariff eventually back to its original value.
Maysville Veto
As president, Jackson saw a distinct separation of federal and state government.
When the Maysville Road Bill came into existence, the funding for the pike was to come partially from the Federal government. Jackson chose to veto this proposal, though, because the building of the road was a project within the state, and should therefore be funded by the state that it benefits.
While his intention was proper, the veto came under scrutiny because while the construction was an intrastate project it was to be part of a nationally benefiting road. Jackson's vetoes, however, were for the most part accepted.
Movement of the Indians west of the Mississippi
Jackson possessed a certain hatred for the Indians, which came to be the national attitude; rather than the original belief that they were civilized savages, they were now considered uncivilized savages incapable of being tamed.
White settlers wanted removal of Indians for fear and, more importantly, their land.
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